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Introduction

This second page discusses the options available for fitting a brake conversion kit. Only the front discs are generally upgraded as this provides most of the braking. The rear brakes only contribute up to ~33% in standard form. A kit involves using a 3rd party supplier to provide a solution with improved braking using non-standard sized parts. This is really the only option available if you intend to use the car on a track. The standard brakes were never designed for this type of use. As an alternative to a kit, you can also use the same method I used by buying parts seperately. Details of this are contained here

The brake conversion kit works on the principle that a larger brake disc in conjunction with a caliper with more pistons will provide a larger heatsink for heat dissipation, while the extra pistons will increase the stopping power.

Before considering this option, you need to decide if you wish to retain the standard wheels or if an increased wheel size appeals to you. Cost is usually the deciding factor here but also, many people do not wish to modify the appearance of their car. Keeping the original wheels, will restrict the choices you have for upgrading the brakes. If increasing the wheel size to 17" is available then the choice is much larger.

The standard wheels vary according to model. The first wheel available was a 5 spoke Speedline wheel shown here. This wheel is 7" wide with a diameter of 16" and an offset of ET37mm. If you look closely at the wheel you will see that the ouside edge has a deep dish of about 20mm. This is important because the other side of the wheel only has a small hub face. This is very restrictive and as a result this wheel does not provide sufficient clearance for 4 piston calipers.

In 1993, the alloy wheel was changed to a six spoke design, again made by Speedline seen here. This wheel is often referred to as the Avus wheel. This wheel is the same diameter but is an extra half inch wider and although the offset is the same, the hub face is significantly longer and as a result gives more clearance. As a result, it is possible to keep this wheel and run larger front brakes. This helps to keep costs down as a set of larger wheels plus tyres on top any brake conversion kit will roughly double the cost.

Standard Wheel Options

The largest sized brake disc which can be used within the 16" wheel is roughly 316mm. Any larger than this and the caliper will start to foul the inside of the alloy wheel. The following suppliers offer a brake conversion kit which will fit inside the standard 6 spoke Speedline wheel. There are probably others, who I have missed. If you know of a company who should be added to this list, then please contact me - details are on the main page.

Mov'it
Dialynx
AMD
Star Performance (AMD Scottish Agent)
HI Spec

The advantages of going through one of these companies is that they supply the full kit and everything will fit. They also offer a fitting service which for many people makes it even better. Typical cost of these kits is roughly ?900 - it depends on who you go to.

Non-standard Wheel Options

If changing the wheels, the options are expanded. The size of the disc is really only restricted by a) your budget and b) the S2 wheel arch design. Most common size of wheel is 17" which should be more than large enough to accommodate the majority of brake disc options. The most popular size of discs used are 322mm or 330mm. It is possible to fit 18" alloys to an S2 without problems if larger discs are desired.

Costs on these kits are generally higher (around the ?1500 mark) due to the generally more expensive parts fitted. The following suupliers all provide big brake upgrades for larger than 16" wheels applications. There are probably others, who I have missed. If you know of a company who should be added to this list, then please contact me.

Tarox
AP Racing
Alcon
Mov'it
Dialynx
AMD
Star Performance (AMD Scottish Agent)
HI Spec